Apr 08 2010

Is Your Business Having A Power Outage?

“We’ve been

                                    

without power

                                                   

for days, and

                              

all we hear is

                              

‘Yeah, soon!'”

                                 

     Been there and done that just a few weeks ago. Let me tell you it’s no fun, especially with an in-home office at 40-degrees, prohibited road travel and no computer access for a computer-based business. Thank God that’s passed (88-degrees today), but recalling the no-heat/no-hot-water/no-power-anything experience, I am prompted to propose that a periodic “Leadership Power Assessment” might prove to be a valuable checkpoint for business owners and managers.

Do your business power shortages promote internal power struggles? Do circuits get overloaded? Do you bring in power washers or introduce power plays with a power lineup capable of delivering a power punch during peak power hours?  . . . Or just rely on flower-power? 

     We all have it. Many wield it. Many use it ineffectively, at the “wrong” times, with the “wrong” people, and in the “wrong” settings. True leaders (military, spiritual, business, educational, sports, home and family, and maybe a handful of government/political types in a few states and lots of small towns) recognize that leadership has more to do with HOW power is exercised than with the amount available. But it must be available. Appliances only work when they’re plugged in.

     Unfortunately, mainstream media continues to believe that the only way to sell advertising time and space is to accentuate the negative, and to focus on making incompetent government leaders appear skillful, well-intentioned, and visionary when they are none of the above. Just imagine one of these national “leaders” running your business for even a week . . . talk about power failure nightmares!

     For effective leadership to happen, power must be exercised transparently with appropriate disclosure of the rationale for a request. Power must be exercised respectfully and diplomatically (except perhaps in military and quasi-military type stress conditions, where captains in storms must order crew compliances without regard for niceties).

     Effective leadership needs also to be anchored in the the reality of best available intelligence resources and findings (turning, for example, to real small business owners for input on legislation impacting small business, or holding customer focus group studies to find out what your customers really think).

     In your own business— as with our national best interests — there cannot be successful exercising of power without the fulltime vigilance it takes to ensure freedom, without carrying Theodore Roosevelt’s big stick while speaking softly. The tools of power must be in place to start with, and fully oiled and maintained if the gentle, warm and fuzzy motivating approach is to ever produce meaningful results. Those who think otherwise are naive in their judgement of terrorist limitations because there are none.

     There is a thin line between flaunting power and quietly having others know it’s available. But removing power from the equation will greatly weaken your business clout and ability to get things done. On a national level, it’s an unforgivable and highly threatening decision . . . all the more reason to shore up what you’ve got invested in your business now, and begin to work at it with a stronger sales focus. Sales are, after all, the only business activity capable of driving economic turnaround. 

Comment below or Hal@BusinessWorks.US Thanks for visiting. Go for your goals! God Bless You! Make it a GREAT Day! Blog via RSS feed or $1/mo Kindle. GRANDPARENT Gift? http://bit.ly/3nDlGF

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